February 2018 Archives

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Fancy words may not disguise hidden auto defect

Consumers may be learning the hard way that words used to describe products may not always be accurate or even truthful. For example, using words like organic, natural and healthy may manipulate consumers into purchasing products they think are better for their bodies. The auto industry apparently has its own set of deceptive words and phrases, and car buyers in California who think they are purchasing a vehicle of higher quality may end up with auto defects.

Bait and switch makes customers victims of dealer fraud

Consumers in California are using online sources more often when considering large purchases, such as vehicles. Going to a dealer's website allows them to browse the inventory without pressure, compare vehicles and seek the best prices. More often, dealers are confronted with educated customers who have done their research, know what they want and are not interested in a long afternoon of wandering through the rows of vehicles. This has resulted in an increase in a familiar type of dealer fraud known as bait and switch.

Lemon law and recalls are evidence of poor quality

California consumers may have noticed the increasing number of automotive recalls in recent years. These recalls for serious and dangerous car defects have not been limited to one geographic area, one manufacturer or one type of defect. Some attribute these widespread issues to an overall lack of attention to quality in car manufacturing which is bringing more people back to dealers for repairs covered under the lemon law or recommended through recalls.

Record number of auto defect class actions in recent years

Airbags are such a crucial element of automotive safety that, decades ago, lawmakers passed a law requiring automakers to include them in all new vehicles. Since then, car manufacturers have continued to advance the technology in an attempt to meet and surpass safety standards. However, instead of protecting drivers and passengers in California and beyond, recent defects in the airbag inflators have placed those lives in danger, prompting auto defect class actions across the country.

3 tips to avoid purchasing a lemon

Purchasing a vehicle is a substantial investment for many. However, once the repairs outweigh the cost of the car early on, it may raise suspicion to whether or not it is a lemon. In California, dealers are required to sell vehicles free from damaged windshields, tires, brakes and lights. New vehicles sold are tethered to state lemon laws until the mileage reaches 18,000 or 18 months after receiving the new purchase.

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